Rob's Poole Pottery

Traditional Contemporary Delphis Tableware Misc Guy Sydenham Your pots  Marks Timeline Buying Sales Bibliography Links blog

Traditional Art Deco Pottery

Art Deco Gallery 1

Art Deco Gallery 1.5

Art Deco Gallery 2

Carter and Company and early Carter Stabler and Adams Gallery

Gallery 1

(Flora)

Gallery 1.5

Gallery 2

(Geometric)

Gallery 3

(Carter & Co/Early CSA)

Fauna

Fauna is perhaps a little over inclusive as a title for a page that's limited more or less to animals of a feathered nature, but this collection is as aspirational as any, and I know there are more furry pots out there that have my name on them - it's just a matter of time. 

 

But for the first two vases below, I'll make no apology.  Both have patterns designed by Truda Carter, on shapes designed by John Adams (Truda Carters first husband).  The right-hand vase is in the Persian Deer pattern and is thought to owe much to Truda Carter's early work as a student at the Royal College of art, where she studied embroidery and incidentally first met John.  The left-hand vase is painted in the Leaping Stag pattern. While in pose it's reminiscent of the springbok bookends that John Adams designed, I'm sure it's adapted from very similar patterns also designed by John Adams, that drew inspiration from the wildlife of South Africa, where John and Truda lived as a young married couple.  Together the two vases are about as boy-girl sexy as pottery can get, but in fact, were designed just a year or two before Truda and John separated and divorced.

 

Click on a pot to enlarge view

click to enlarge

Right, Leaping Stag TZ pattern vase, shape number 213, 24 cm tall painted by Ruth Paveley between 1922 and 1934.

Left, Persian Deer SK pattern vase, shape number 199, 18 cm tall,  painted by Ruth Paveley between 1937 and 1940

 

Stretching the this galleries classification to breaking point, the group of pots below are a total cheat, but it is the closest I'm likely to get to owning a Poole vase with a lion design.  V Pattern, is also known as Leo the Lion, due to the appearance of the cheeky chappie with a rather psychedelic blue mane in place of the blue flower.  Several other Truda Carter patterns also have acronyms that refer to the pictographic ambiguity within the designs.

 

Click on a pot to enlarge view

click a pot to enlarge view

V Pattern, AKA Leo the Lion

Back, shape no 966, 25cm tall vase, painted by Ruth Pavely between 1934 and '37.  Right, shape no 620, 18cm tall vase, painted by Ruth Pavely between 1934 and '37. Left, shape number 117, 8cm tall vase, unknown painters mark 1934 and '37.  Front, shape number 354, 8.5cm tall vase, painted by Myrtle Bond between between 1934 and '37.

 

Click on a pot to enlarge view

Comic Birds

From left to right; shape number 208, 8cm tall vase, QB "Comic Bird" pattern painted by Nellie Bishton between 1927 and '34; shape number 230, 15cm tall cookie jar, SN pattern painted by Marian Heath between 1925 and '34; and shape number 361, 9cm tall vase, QB pattern painted by Gwen Dry between 1928 and ' 34.

 

The "comic bird" pattern also has fantastic "bug eyes" at the bottom, which just adds to making it even more collectable.

 

Click on a pot to enlarge view

More Jam Pots

From left to right; shape number 286, 10cm tall preserve jar, FX pattern painted by Eileen Prangnell between 1924 and '34; shape number 260, 110cm tall preserve jar, AS pattern painted by Gwen Dry between 1928 and '34; and shape number 288, 10cm tall preserve jar, QB pattern painted by Margaret Holder between 1925 and '34

 

 

Click on a vase to enlarge view

click on a pot to enlarge

Poole Pottery Traditional Bluebird Decorated Pots, HE, FX and PB Patterns

From left to right;  shape number 112, 12cm tall vase, PB pattern, painted by Rene Hayes between 1926 and'34 ; shape number 970, 24cm tall vase,  HE pattern painted by Ruth Pavely between 1922 and '34; and shape number 581 ,10cm tall vase, FX pattern, painted by Gladys Jeffery between1926 and '34.

 

Click to enlarge view

click on a pot to enlarge

More Bluebirds

These bluebird wall plaques are shape number 807/1 (smallest), /2 and /3 and were designed and modeled by John Adams and Harry Brown in the mid to late 1930's and sprayed with the "Picotee" glazes (used for the stripy pots of the same name) These particular bird's probably date from about that time, and would have been sold separately, though the 3 make up the complete set. Seagulls (one below) and of course the ubiquitous ducks were also available from Poole, and while these were made by other potteries too, I think bluebirds would have been a unique production from the Poole Pottery, lifted, as they are, straight from the popular PB pattern painted on vases and pots.

 

Click a bird to enlarge view

Click to enlarge

And a surprisingly large Seagull in a right dog fight

Seagull shape number 818/3, at 27cm from wing tip to toe this is he largest in the set of 3 wall plaques.  Duck shape number 812/2 (18cm long),  middle sized in the set of 3

 

 

Cubist possibly half eaten flower   blue and yellow slug   More food

Three views of the same Poole Pottery egg cup shape number 713 (4cm tall), FL pattern, painted by Hilda Trim between 1934 and 1937

Traditional Poole Pottery typically is decorated with geometric shapes and abstract floral patterns, birds (of several different kinds) and rather grand deer and even lions.  Lower down the food chain however, the FL pattern egg cup above features a blue and yellow slug, with a (possibly half eaten) cubist abstract flower.

 

The widget below is showing ebay listings for traditional Poole Pottery that are ending now 

 

Gallery 1

(Flora)

Gallery 2

(geometric)

Gallery 3

(Carter & Co/Early CSA)

 

Guest Book

Started December 2008                                                                                                                                                            Last updated: 16/07/2017

   Bookmark and Share             Sitemap                        Contact me                                      Privacy policy for Google ads on this site